New ‘Coffee Song’

Another ‘Coffee Song’ to add to the list. Black Coffee by Humble Pie from 1973.

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Easter Schedule/Horaires de Pâque

Please note that during the Easter Weekend in April Art Brûlant will be closed from Good Friday (April 3, 2015) to the following Tuesday (April 7, 2015).

Thank you

RRR

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Se il vous plaît noter que pendant le fin de semaine de Pâques en Avril Art Brûlant seront fermés du Vendredi Saint (3 Avril, 2015) au mardi suivant (7 Avril, 2015).

Merci

RRR

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Featured Roast/Torréfaction de la semaine: Re-take on a Classic – Mocha Java

One of the oldest coffee blends combining beans from different coffee growing regions in the world is the blend we know as Mocha Java. Mocha Java as a blend is historically made from beans from the country of Yemen using the ancient port of Mocha as their point of departure, and from the island of Java, now part of Indonesia in the asian coffee growing region. In both cases the beans were of the Arabica variety.

Today we can still source beans of the ‘Mocha’ type from Yemen. The beans from Java pose more of a challenge since these days Java’s coffee crop comprises mainly the Robusta variety of coffee.

This weeks Featured Roast is another take on the Mocha Java classic. For the ‘Mocha’ I have used a Yemen Mocha Mattari. The Mocha Mattari brings a dried fruit depth and a long finish to the cup. For the ‘Java’ I have moved away from Java itself and used a combination of two other asian grown coffees. The first is the Indian Monsooned Malabar. The Monsooned Malabar brings added depth, smoothness and a nutty hint to the cup. The other asian coffee is of the Robusta variety, the Indian Kaapi Royale. The Kaapi brings a bit of a wild edge to the flavour with a bit of pepper, not to mention the higher caffeine level of the Robusta coffee bean.

I have been enjoying this as a French press and pour-over, but my preference so far is as an espresso. The intensity is really nice and the robusta helps give a really nice stiff creme.

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Featured Roast/Torréfaction de la semaine: Not quite all African!

This board has been a little quiet recently. The roaster has still been busy and the coffees have been here, but my activity with the blog has been on the slow side……molasses at this time of year and all.

That being said, we still have some of the Galapagos coffee from the El Cafetal plantation on San Cristobal island. In addition we continue to offer the Murago from the region of Muyinga in Burundi. Then something that hasn’t been on the feature list for awhile is the Wild Forest Harvest coffee from the Kaffa region in Ethiopia.

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Featured Roast/Torréfaction de la semaine: My mistake…. A Sort Of Mistake!

I stand corrected! I must admit to mislabelling the one coffee for the feature. It is actually not a returning favourite but a brand new star!

Like the Gakana this one is sourced from Kalico of the Kahawa Link Co. of Burundi, but  is from Murago in the region of Muyinga in the northern part of the country.

Cupping notes supplied by my supplier from Burundi , was 87+ with the following details:

  • A well balanced coffee
  • Orange
  • Clean
  • Very good acidity
  • Makes a good espresso

Additional information:

  •  Altitude: 1720m
  • Crop: 2014-2015
  • Quality: FW 15+
  • Variety: Bourbon
  • Screen: +15

My own experience concurs with the quality and flavour of the coffee. I might add that it has a rich taste with good body. And yes the espresso I am sipping at the moment is very nice!

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Featured Roast/Torréfaction de la semaine: Something Old, Something new….Sort Of!

To help make the transition from 2014 to 2015 we are starting the New Year off with some old friends, a couple of coffees from December 2014, the Sumatra Mandheling and the Indian Monsooned Malabar. Not boring just comfortable!

Then for something new…sort of, we have an even older friend back for a long visit, the Kinyangurube Gakana from Burundi. This is one coffee I have been looking forward to having in again.

Something warm for a cold January 2015.

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Grinder Experiments: So Far………

Coffee grinders are a must. Here in the shop I have a Swiss made Ditting that I use for everything. It is a great grinder. Easily adjustable grind, fast (but not too fast), powerful. Well worth its rather high price tag. The consistency of its grind has also become the standard by which I measure other grinders.

I did have another, an expensive, fancy name brand, that I was using for the espresso side of things here but it gave out. When, in the course of my discussion with the manufacturer, I asked if they could guarantee that I wouldn’t have the same problem again I didn’t get a response. It would be nice to have another, but for now the Ditting will do.

At home we have used the same hand grinder for almost twenty years. Good quality hand grinders are quieter and generally more durable and usually less expensive than their electric counterparts. It is by Salter & Co. They no longer exist. For most of this time we have used the French Press as the go to coffee brewer. More recently Espresso, the AeroPress and the occasional pour-over have made their way into the home brewing scene.

With these other brewing methods came the need for more variety in the grind of the coffee. The old coffee grinder is adjustable but somewhat fiddly. In fact most hand grinders seem to be fiddly, and most good quality electric grinders, though quite adjustable, are noisy, rather large and very expensive (and the Ditting is a bit over-kill). So I looked for another hand grinder to use for Espresso.

The search continues, but this is what I have found so far………….

Salter & Co.

IMG_0375

Pros:

  • Nice size
  • Can be clamped to the counter or fastened to the wall allowing one handed operation
  • Durable cast metal construction
  • Fairly fast grind for a hand grinder

Cons:

  • Fiddly grind adjustment
  • Less consistent grind then the Ditting, and then I prefer

Hario Small Compact Grinder

Pros:

  • Nice compact size – good for campers, cyclists
  • Ceramic burrs
  • Quiet
  • Fairly consistent grind

Cons:

  • Fiddly grind adjustment but less so than the Salter
  • Grind adjustment slips
  • Mostly plastic construction
  • Two hand operation – have to hold onto the grinder while operating
  • A little slower than I really want

Porlex Mini Grinder

IMG_0380

Pros:

  • Nice compact size – again good for campers, cyclists
  • Ceramic burrs
  • Quiet
  • Quite consistent grind (a bit more consistent then the Hario)
  • Mostly metal construction

Cons:

  • Fiddly grind adjustment but less so than the Salter – similar to the compact Hario
  • Two hand operation – have to hold onto the grinder while operating
  • Again a little slower than I would like

Hario Small Box Grinder

IMG_0384

Pros:

  • Nice compact size – though not what I would carry on a camping trip
  • Fairly robust construction with a classic look
  • Ceramic burrs
  • Quiet
  • Relatively consistent grind – closer to the Porlex than its little brother

Cons:

  • Fiddly grind adjustment
  • Two hand operation – have to hold onto the grinder while operating
  • A little slower than I really want

Antique Peugeot Box Grinder

IMG_0366

Pros:

  • Looks great! (Though not a camping accessory.)
  • Very durable cast iron construction
  • Fairly quiet but not as quiet as the Porlex
  • One handed operation
  • Faster grind then others
  • Can be attached to the counter top
  • Can grind large amounts at time

Cons:

  • Fiddly grind adjustment similar to the Hario box grinder
  • Still a little slower than I really want
  • Rather large
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